Mother Nature is the artist. I just collect the memories…

Something Different…

Back in the days of darkroom processing, and long before color film became widely used, photographers would sometimes play around a little with colorizing.  Most of the time, the technique would consist of literally hand painting a B&W print.  The print itself would take care of clarifying the subject, while the paint used, usually a thin watercolor, would add a semblance of color to the image.  Sometimes the effect was quite stunning.  Most of the time it was mediocre at best.  Sometimes it was just plain horrible.  But when it worked, the effect was quite interesting.

In today’s digital world, this technique is all but forgotten.  Fear not, there is a way to accomplish this with Photoshop, or whatever you use.  I use Corel Paint Shop Pro Photo Ultimate 12.5.  It’s a good program for basic editing and intermediate manipulations, but not as deep as CS4.  Anyhow…

Colorized Round

Colorized Round

Colorized Cross

Colorized Cross

Both of these were shot in monotone, and processed as per my normal workflow, adjusting brightness, contrast, sharpness, and clarity to suit my taste…just like a B&W print would have been.  Than, I copied the image, and pasted it as a new layer.  I “colorized” the original shot using my Hue/Saturation channel, and selectively erased the monuments from the top layer, to reveal the colorized layer below.   I did add a heavy Gaussian blur to the B&W trees in the green cross…  The effect is similar to what a B&W print hand painted with watercolors would look like.

Depending on your desires, you can really make some interesting stuff using this technique.  I’m not that artistic and I remain very basic in my manipulations.  But there is no reason why you couldn’t use as many layers of color as you wanted to create as deep an image as possible.  The potential is really limited only by your imagination, so…go play!

Thanks for reading!

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